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mitchell, bob michaels, and bob dole. there is no question none of this could have happened without them coming to the table and understanding how important it was to achieve a result. i also have to emphasize what i believe is the fundamental catalyst for all of this. that is there was a president who was determined to solve this issue. absolutely determined. as we see, not only was he willing, but he ended up sacrificing tremendous political capital, personal political capital in order to do what he felt the country needed at that time. there are a lot of folks who like these kinds of agreements to take place in a climate where there are no politics. it will never happen. it will never happen because politics is the cement that holds the system together, not what divides it. in my opinion, there are three political aspects that have to be looked at in what happened in 1990 and certainly have parallels to what is going on today. there are the politics of the differences in philosophy. there certainly is a liberal perspective, generally attributed to the democratic party, a conservative
's the chief of staff to governor bob macdonald. to denise northrop came from state of oklahoma where she is chief of staff to governor mary phalen and roxanne white is joining us from the great state of colorado where she's chief of staff to governor john hicken looper. and so their full bios are on the pamphlets and nare all very accomplished professionals in their careers. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and we can come down this way. >> great. first, thank you for the report. i think it provides a good framework for all of us as states to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% solvent. we did major reform in the last administration. and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%. and so to give you a sense of how far behind we were as a state, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we as a state have a right to ratchet down the colas for our state employees, then we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. so it's fairly
chairman of this committee. pablo this committee from 1995 to 1997. -- bob led this committee from 1995 to 1997. welcome, bob. retired major-general ronald siegel. he currently serves as vice president enterprise executive for energy in the environment for colorado state university and ohio state university. led a distinguished career in the u.s. air force. d.o.d. executive force base, and prior to that, director of defense research and technology. he flew two space shuttles. we certainly welcome you. >> we welcome, honorable marion blakey, president and ceo representing more than 150 leading aerospace manufacturers. ms. thank you served a five-year term as administrator of the f.a.a. -- ms. blakey served a five- year term as administrator of the f.a.a. we do certainly welcome you. but associate prof. for space science and engineering at the university of michigan, specialist in robotic exploration and space and team leader for the development for the fast imaging plasma spectrometer on messenger spacecraft. we certainly welcome you. dr. scott pages a director of the space policy instit
the privilege and honor to help in his campaign and i have been in san diego with bob, the love and the affection that his constituents have for congressman filner is just really unparalleled. i want to congratulate him for his magnificent win. it was a tough campaign, but he did an unbelievable job and that's because people in his district really knew him and he had provided the level of services that allowed him to be elected now as -- we will call him very soon, mayor filner. joe baca, congressman baca, has been a voice for the poor and underserved during his entire career, not only here in congress but in the california legislature. i was privileged to work with joe on many, many issues, and he has been a consistent voice, both in the california legislature and now here in congress, for protecting low-income families from unfair predatory and credit practices. he has used his seat on the house agricultural committee and house financial services committee to help the most vulnerable americans. he has consistently played a role in raising funding levels for food stamps and nut
. arnie is so involved in so many different associations and organizations that bob hope would often say, "arnie has so many irons in the fire that has to play the tour with his woods." he did not set out to change the game, but he did. arnold palmer democratized gulf. and made us think that we, too, could go out and play. made us think that we could do anything, really. all we had to do was go out and try. my colleagues are sitting in the back. some of my colleagues about the french are betting that boehner will not make it through this. -- in the back are betting that boehner will not make it through this. [laughter] i will not tell the story today that i really wanted to, about arnold palmer and i -- arnold palmer and i, a moment we had 10 or 12 years ago. i guess i'm going to tell the story. [laughter] it was the first championship, and we were on the practice green. i had played at a little bit country club a couple of weeks before that -- latrobe country club in a couple of weeks before that. i saw arnie on the practice green and told him how much i enjoyed playing at latrobe. arni
with china and the united states right now, and what do you see as the challenges in the years ahead? >> bob, thank you very much, and it's great to be back at csis and to be with my friends and colleagues on the panel. i very much appreciate the opportunity. i think as all of you have seen, over the last several years the obama administration, in really a bipartisan spirit, has sought to step up our game in the asia-pacific region, to increase our diplomatic, our commercial, our strategic and our political interactions really across the board. and when we think about it -- it's been termed either the pivot or rebalancing -- a key component of that is frankly our desire to improve and increase our interactions and our relationship with china. we all recognize its importance on the global stage. and frankly, the region and the world demands that the united states and china make an extraordinary effort to make sure that our relationship is strong and stable and predictable. you referred to this long history of what are often referred to as hegemonic transitions. one of the things i would say i
responsibility. i can remember bob michael getting up and saying i am proud of voting for this. if you want it to the congressman vote for somebody else. that is a gutsy thing to do. he kept getting reelected. host: john from pennsylvania. caller: thank you for having me. i think the problem is in gdp. we do not produce anything. we do not create any jobs. as far as china is concerned we do not hit that high of a tariff on their imports. i believe it is a lot higher. the whole thing was steve jobs. he treated the apple computer in his garage. when he got successful theme of his company over to china giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he would not even be able to create the apple computer. we just do not do enough for the people of this country. the people who are position to create jobs do not reinvest in the country. i do not think they should get tax breaks. if you want to give these corporate giant tax breaks given to those who want to invest in the country and create jobs. for a lower than the american businessmen. guest: i understand your frustration. part of i
there is duplication. there are clearly areas where we can provide greater efficiencies. we were able, bob gates before me begin that effort. we have added about $60 billion on top of that in terms of further efficiencies. we will continue to review where greater efficiencies can be achieved. i ask that question when i first became secretary. what is the role of the service secretary visa be the service chief? the reality is that there is an important role for them. they are civilians. civilians are involved in providing policy in their areas. the also have to negotiate a lot of the politics. so there is an important role for them to play in terms of their particular service. having said that, there are a lot of other places where we can achieve savings in the pentagon and we will. >> at the defense department deals with downsizing services, have you considered cuts to the number of flight in general officers? >> i think that is part and parcel. as you do force reduction, we will be reducing the structure and i think as that happens, they have to review not just the reductions in our troops but also th
york, bob mendez from new jersey and i believe senator gillibrand will be here shortly. the senators have been a strong partners in this rebuilding effort. it is a great privilege to work together. we are really strong team we share the value of a quick action and sufficient resources to get this job done. as i mentioned, we are in the largest transportation. in the country and it takes diligence and skill of our friends and colleagues. senator schumer. >> thank you, mr. chairman. first, thank you for this hearing but also for your great partnership. new york and new jersey were together as a bipartisan by- date delegation along with our colleagues from rest of the northeast to deal with this awful, awful devastation. it is good you are in so many important positions that will have a lot of say in how we deal with this and we're grateful forthank you, ranking , senator wicker. west hamilton beach was in my old congressional district. it is one of the few volunteer fire departments in new york city. it is right on the water, the great jamaica bay. the generosity of mississippi to west
together the way ronald reagan and tip o'neill did, the way clinton did with bob dole, and newt gingrich. there is a long history of this. it means people getting into a room and preventing what we all want to prevent, and if we share the same goal, there should be a way for us to reach it. i am sorry that the house yesterday was unable to pass that the resolution, which was obviously a rebuke to their leader, but hopefully over their recess, when the come back after christmas, there will be cooler heads prevail in, and the president will begin serious negotiations. thanks. >> he looked at the house and senate reaction to the attack on the u.s. consulate. you also look at the accountability review board on how the state department handled the matter. today's at 6:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> the issues, a different times the government can punish them as a result of the moral condemnation. the answer is once. >> c-span radio is featuring supreme court oral arguments before they were on the bench. all this week at 7:00 p.m. eastern. it to watch this in the baltimore area. >> on wed. pres
to the mid 30s. bob dole in the midst of the anti-immigrant sentiment of the 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the magic 40% that karl rove thought was the jumping off point for neutralizing all of these questions. so, you know, we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here. so, if you -- you know, a 10% shift in the latino votes moving 1 million to 1.3 million, you know, the actual -- what the turnout is, we don't really know yet. it's going to take a while. the exit poll numbers are losing credibility as time goes on, but that's -- i don't want to get too -- >> yes. >> you know, geeky with you [laughter] a shift to a million voters, million and a half voters, and romney would have been in the mid 30s in terms of his share, and everybody would have said, "that was a pretty good night for a republican." now, what would have happened in terms of actual states, i knew you were going to ask that -- [laughter] >> and then i want to go down the row, getting everyone. >> it's interesting, because it doesn't -- it would have -- i'll leave it to the pundits
gentlemen, colonel stewart, who entered the chamber at the back. [applause] >> bob, thank you for your support for the uk youth parliament. now i'd like to ask to conclude the debate from scotland, mr. reardon fortune toind up the debate. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. i would first like to extend my sympathies to the scottish parliament membe who can't be with here today. so here i am. >> we just heard fromsome fantastic points for and against but a few stand out in my mind. this is right that someone of our age, doing the exact same amount of work and the exact same profession can legally be paid substantially less than someone in their 30s? it is unacctable when it's aged toward young people. will minimum wage help young people or aravate youth unemployment. as we all know, 16 and 17-year-oldsecve minimum wage. 18 and 17-year-olds receive more and anyonever 21 receive more. are we to take from this the government believes the 18 and 17-year-olds to b less hard working or 16 and 17 years are less hard working. i should hope not. it's also cuttinged the more people are paid, le
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12

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